Tag: TarBox Hollow Poultry

Use Green Tea to Prevent Avian Influenza

Use Green Tea to Prevent Avian Influenza

Green tea has been grown since ancient times, making a traditional tea that originated in China and has become a popular brew in Japan and China. Green tea leaves contain antioxidants and flavonoids. The compounds in green tea are known to be very effective in 

Learn How to Make a Self-Feeder for Poultry

Learn How to Make a Self-Feeder for Poultry

While there are many types of containers designed to feed chickens, here is a self-feeder that I have adapted that works well for my set up. I like it because it is efficient, keeps the food clean and allows the chickens to eat as much 

Avian Influenza Strikes Flock in Iowa 2022

Avian Influenza Strikes Flock in Iowa 2022

Cream & Gold Crele Legbars

A single case of avian flu has been diagnosed in Council Bluffs Iowa region. If the disease moves west it could be a huge challenge for Nebraska poultry growers. Officials in Iowa substantiated the occurrence of this extremely transmissible disease, week of March 3rd, 2022, found in Pottawattamie County, it was discovered in a small flock of less than 50 birds and all birds were destroyed and incinerated to minimize all risks further spread of the disease.

This was the first incident of Avian Flu since 2015, when this awful disease killed more than 50 million chickens and turkeys. Currently there has been “no cases in Nebraska” according to the state veterinarian Roger Dudley, with Nebraska Department Agriculture. “Everybody needs to continue to be prepared,” Dudley said. “He asks that poultry producers monitor their flocks for symptoms, which include decreased water consumption, lack of energy and more. “If everybody can follow the proper biosecurity and do our best to keep domestic poultry away from wild waterfowl, hopefully we can continue to prevent avian influenza from getting into Nebraska,” he said.

“Avian Influenza Last Occurrence in 2015 killed over 50 million Chickens and Turkeys”

Nebraska Department of Agriculture Press Release March 2, 2022

NDA ADVISES POULTRY OWNERS TO WATCH FOR AVIAN INFLUENZA
LINCOL
N –The Nebraska Department of Agriculture (NDA) is advising poultry owners to
protect their flocks against avian influenza by closely monitoring their birds for signs of the
disease and by maintaining strict biosecurity practices. Highly pathogenic avian influenza
(HPAI) is very contagious and can cause severe illness and/or sudden death in domestic birds.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture has confirmed HPAI in commercial and/or backyard flocks
in Connecticut, Delaware, Iowa, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Michigan, New York and Virginia.
To date, the virus has not been found in Nebraska

Blue Laced Red Wyandottes TarBox Hollow Poultry

“While we have not seen HPAI in Nebraska since 2015, protecting the health of poultry in the
state is a top priority,” said State Veterinarian Dr. Roger Dudley. “It’s important for poultry
owners to know about this disease, take the necessary steps to help prevent its spread, and protect
Nebraska’s poultry industry.”

Dudley is asking Nebraska poultry producers, large and small, to monitor their flocks for
symptoms of HPAI, review and maintain their biosecurity activities, and notify NDA
immediately if they suspect any problems. Bird owners should report unusual bird deaths or sick birds to NDA at 800-831-0550 or 402-471-2351, or through USDA at 866-536-7593.

English Crele Orpington Hen

Symptoms of Avian Influenza

  • Decrease in Water Consumption
  • Lack of Energy and Appetite
  • Decreased Egg Production
  • Soft Shelled Eggs
  • Nasal discharge, coughing, sneezing
  • Incoordination
  • Diarrhea
  • Sudden Death
White Ameraucanas at TarBox Hollow Poultry

The deadly virus can exist for several weeks in a contaminated environment.

Dudley is asking Nebraska poultry producers, large and small, to monitor their flocks for symptoms of HPAI, review and maintain their biosecurity activities, and notify NDA immediately if they suspect any problems. Bird owners should report unusual bird deaths or sick birds to NDA at 800-831-0550 or 402-471-2351, or through USDA at 866-536-7593.

Enhanced biosecurity helps prevent the introduction and spread of viruses and diseases including HPAI. NDA and USDA have resources available to help poultry owners step up their biosecurity efforts
Biosecurity Measures See NDA HPAI Brochure

For more information about avian influenza, visit NDA’s website
https://nda.nebraska.gov/animal/avian/index.html or the USDA’s website
https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/. Additional information on biosecurity for backyard flocks
can be found at http://healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov


Self-Blue Ameraucanas at TarBox Hollow Poultry




TREATING POULTRY DISEASES WITH GREEN TEA

TREATING POULTRY DISEASES WITH GREEN TEA

GREEN TEA & COCCIDIOSIS There have been multiple studies conducted using green tea for the treatment and prevention of avian diseases. In a study done in Korea where green tea was added to poultry feed, there was a 50% reduction in coccidiosis oocyst output, while maintaining 

Lice & Mite Prevention

Lice & Mite Prevention

Lice & Mite Prevention Lice & mites are minute external parasites that live off of poultry, they are extremely resilient to all types of environmental conditions, including freezing cold temperatures. They are vicious blood-sucking pests that invade your coop attacking poultry compromising their health. Consider 

Preventing Respiratory Illness with Poultry

Preventing Respiratory Illness with Poultry

Keeping chickens healthy in the winter, can be more challenging, than the greener times of summer, when they can munch on weeds and bugs, that naturally keeps them healthier. Closing chickens indoors for protection from the adverse weather can set up the right conditions for creating an ammonia filled environment, which can harm the sensitive airways of chickens. Ammonia is formed by an excessive buildup of feces and wetness in the coop.  High levels of ammonia in the coop, can lead to respiratory illness. The illness can be a problematic condition.
Belgian Quail d’Anver
causing egg production to drop off, and even death. Classic symptoms of the disease are coughing, wheezing, discharge from eyes and nose, sitting in a slumped position with ruffled feathers and often a lack of appetite. While many diseases cause this ill-fated condition, respiratory illness caused by ammonia may be one of the easiest to prevent.   

Take these Steps to Keep your Flock Healthy  

  • Check bedding daily making sure it is dry, avoiding the formation of ammonia.
  • Block any drafts, preventing cold air blowing directly on your birds while they roost.
  • Good ventilation is a must, consider installing wall vents and or box fans.
  • Feed good quality feed with ample clean drinking water daily.
  • Look at ways to keep feces out of feed and water pans, try covering pans partially covering, hanging or raising up feeders and waters.
  • Do not overcrowd them.
  • Use bedding that is low in dust.
  • Add 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar per gallon of water using a non-metallic pan, it is an antiseptic that potentially destroys bad bacteria, encourages water consumption, and it supports good digestive health.
  • Boost their immune system by supplementing their feed regime with probiotics, vitamins, and electrolytes.
  • Use agricultural lime in the coop, spread a thin layer under the bedding when you clean, it an inexpensive way to help keep your coop dryer and cleaner. Agricultural lime has a high pH component that naturally destroys the bacteria that creates ammonia and is safe for chickens and other animals. It is used commonly in barns also known as barn lime and it is also beneficial for landscape and garden. Be sure not to confuse it with hydrated lime, which is not recommended for chickens.
  • Consider the administration of essential oils, many large broiler farms are feeding oregano in place of antibiotics. See “In Hopes of Healthier Chickens, Farms Turn to Oregano,” New York Times. Oregano has natural antibiotic and antiparasitic properties currently are being studied as an antidote for coccidiosis and infectious bronchitis. Orego stim is an excellent source of oregano designed for chicks and chickens, developed in the United Kingdom, it is very economical and easy to administer in adding drinking water.
  • Take steps to ensure they have a healthy living environment, by ensuring their living area is kept dry and clean coop regularly avoiding pile-up of ammonia causing manure.
  • If you smell ammonia, so can they, it’s time to clean 😊 

Treatment

 

While managing your flock to keep them healthy, sometimes they still acquire a respiratory illness. Consider keeping an antibiotic on hand in your first aid kit, see your veterinary for a recommendation. Rosemary essential oil can assist in treatment, mix 15 drops to 1 tablespoon of cooking oil and mix well. Apply rosemary mixture to head, neck, and underwings to help clear airways.

 Blue Birchen Maran cockerel 7 months old

Good Care Strategy

Chickens are tough, with resilience to all sorts of adverse conditions, and as you may know, it is much easier to take care of a healthy bird, than treat one for an illness. The best strategy is to develop a daily care plan that includes a clean environment and quality feed with additional nutrients to support excellent health from inside out. Manage your flock with these good animal husbandry practices keeping ammonia caused respiratory issues to a minimum.

A healthy flock will yield healthy chicks

 


300 Cases of Newcastle Disease In California

300 Cases of Newcastle Disease In California

300 Cases of Newcastle Disease In California Poultry World reports January 21, 2019, that there have been 300 cases confirmed of the deadly Newcastle Disease in California since May 2018. Utah has recently first confirmed its first case of Newcastle disease, which is believed to 

American Poultry Asociation

American Poultry Asociation

American Poultry Association originated back in 1873 and is one of the oldest livestock organizations in the United States today. They have established breed guidelines, that are used by poultry judges across the United States. Their Motto “to promote and protect the standard breed poultry industry